JUSTISIGNS project comes to a close.


It is difficult to believe that some thirty months ago our expert project team met to consider just how JUSTISIGNS would shape up and whether and what we do as a consortium could make a difference to the society in which we live and the communities that we serve.

We have achieved so much in a relatively short period and there is much to be proud of.  JUSTISIGNS has laid a solid foundation for the development of professional skills of sign language interpreters working in legal settings and achieved commendable results, which we recently presented alongside distinguished partners and panelists at the European Parliament on 27th April 2016. Engagement with our stakeholders has been wide, and profound. Contributions from the Deaf community, the interpreting professionals, the police forces and legal professionals from each partner countries has been significant. JUSTISIGNS has grown its own legs and we are confident that the resources that we have collectively produced will bring many benefits well beyond the life-cycle of the project and for many years to come.  JUSTISIGNS represents a further step forward. Our academic partners created cutting-edge and innovative content. efsli and EULITA have engaged in extensive dissemination of information through their networks and social media channels. We also pay tribute to all the professionals who have been involved in developing the various project outputs. Expertise, professional knowledge and invaluable human resources have been the key to the success of JUSTISIGNS. We are grateful for every contribution – whether it was tweeting our results, participating at training events or providing us guidance and support.

I would also like to acknowledge our partners and the teams from:

  • Interesource Group (Ireland) Limited
  • KU Leuven (Faculty of Arts, Campus Antwerp)
  • EULITA, the European Legal Interpreters and Translators Association
  • The Centre for Deaf Studies (CDS), Trinity College Dublin
  • The University of Applied Sciences for Special Needs Education (HfH, Switzerland)
  • Centre for Translation & Interpreting Studies in Scotland (CTISS), Heriot-Watt University

The commitment and capability of the project’s partners have contributed to JUSTISIGNS’ remarkable results. JUSTISIGNS has evolved through a series of events, seminars, workshops and evidence-based research which has guided the development of the training resources. In addition, we are continuing to work with our stakeholders to provide advice and training, we are planning to roll out the JUSTISIGNS course to new territories and we are achieving success in securing presentations at conferences throughout 2016 and 2017.

Some of the other results we now look forward to launching are a series of handbooks for the police forces in all partner countries, a comprehensive online course for legal professionals, interpreters and the deaf community and a research documentary which features experiences of legal professionals, policy makers, educators and the Deaf community. efsli has been working on developing a template of a portfolio of competencies which SLIs can use to record their continuous professional development (CPD) activities, and we look forward to sharing this with you in the very near future.

We hope you will enjoy this short video and find it inspiring with new food for thought for future achievements and ongoing collaboration with us.

Don’t forget to follow us on twitter @JUSTISIGNS and do visit the website http://www.justisigns.com


We’re 20 years in business today!

Today, Interesource Group (Ireland) Limited celebrates 20 years in business. Our small company – with a few directors and many consultants and partners, set out to make a difference for our clients and customers. On 28th June 1996 the company was registered and  started an international recruitment service provider for JI students travelling to the USA.

Twenty years later, we remain a debt-free, small Irish business which has survived a turbulent economic period and we now specialise in 4 key areas: HR and Business Consulting; Publishing; Creative Media and Design, and Education and Training. (IGI Consulting, IGI Publishing, IGI Media, IGI Education).

We never set out to make millions. We set out to make a difference. We have had the privilege of working with global field experts from 22 countries and we have learned so much. We have had the pleasure of sponsoring and supporting great causes from disability charities, social clubs, local organisations and international projects that support education of disadvantaged societies.

As we enter our 21st year in business, we will harness the experiences we have gained, coupled with the trust we have earned from our very loyal clients, colleagues and friends, and we commit to growing our business so that we can continue to innovate, meet newer challenges and make greater differences for the societies that we live and work in.

I would like to thank every person, organisation and partner that has worked with us since we started. I hope we have always met your expectation and I look forward to building on the wonderful relationships and friendships for the next 20 years.

Haaris Sheikh, Chief Executive

Community Interpreting: JUSTISIGNS Team with DCU and the Graduate Entry Medical School (UL)

attendees

Attending the 5th Community Interpreting Conference are:(Left-Right) Mr.Haaris Sheikh (Justisigns Project Chair/CEO Interesource Group), Ms.Lucia Venturi (TCD), Dr.Mary Phelan (DCU), Professor Lorraine Leeson (TCD) & Professor Anne MacFarlane (UL).

The 5th Community Interpreting Conference was hosted by UL in the  Graduate Entry Medical School on May 20th. The event was well attended with presentations from  colleagues from Dublin City University, Trinity College Dublin, University College Cork, the HSE and the Garda Racial, Intercultural and Diversity Office (GRIDO).

An annual event, the conference is designed to bring together academics, researchers and service providers to share their work in the area of community interpreting. The JUSTISIGNS team discussed the results of the international survey and also some of the strategies and solutions for interpreters and the legal professionals when interacting with Deaf sign language users.

For any queries ideas or suggestions please contact Haaris on 087 2270311 or

email: info@justisigns.com

 

100 Years exactly since the reading of the 1916 Proclamation – and now in Irish Sign Language


1916 Proclamation in Irish Sign Language on YouTube with optional subtitles

1916 Proclamation in Irish Sign Language on YouTube with subtitles

Download the 1916 Proclamation text here


While the centenary commemoration of the 1916 Proclamation was marked on Easter Monday 28th March this year, the actual reading of the  1916 Proclamation was on 24th April 1916, shortly after noon. Today is a day to be celebrated in Ireland.

The Ireland 2016 Centenary Programme commissioned Interesource Group to produce the translated video to ensure that alongside the reading of the 1916 Proclamation which guarantees “equal rights and equal opportunities to all its citizens” that the Irish Sign Language using community would have full access to the 1916 Proclamation in their own language. This facilitates full participation of Deaf citizens on what will be an historic day. This is extremely important as Deaf citizens are continually excluded from daily participation in all walks of life, and this impinges on the opportunity to engage as full citizens. One of the reasons for this is the fact that ISL is not legally recognised or protected in Ireland as an official language of the State, a fact that increasingly marks us out from our European and International counterparts.

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EU Directive 01/04 moves to simplify English grammar in all official documentation

New EU Regulations are to be introduced to simplify EU English as a cost-saving exercise across the main European institutions this year. This move comes about as proofreading and re-printing costs soar in the EU institutions, who insist on all formal documentation being made available in English, French and German.

English is widely regarded to be one of the most difficult languages to master. Despite its widespread use as the lingua franca, both English-speakers and people learning English as a foreign language have complained (despite the availability of spell checks) about how hard it is to spell English worlds correctly. For the same reasons institutions such as the European Parliament have increasingly found that EU documentation have more grammatical errors as well as correspondence containing mixed appearances of European English, American English and British English, also known to many as Queens English.

Research conducted by the AAA found that most people surveyed were in favour of simplifying English grammar by abolishing the terms “Queens English”, “British English” and “American English” and replacing these collective terms with just the term “English”. Keyboard manufacturers have cautiously welcomed the EU Directive as they feel that this will allow manufacturers such as Apple to continue to reduce the size of their keyboards. Interestingly research shows that keystroke software (which runs in the background of all computers automatically) analyses the keys that people use has reported that the exclamation mark and the apostrophe are the least used keys across all 27 member state’s in Europe!!! And while eradicating these keys from our keyboards won’t be anything we need to be worried about in the short-term – linguistics and purists fear that such drastic measures will ultimately result in the emergence of a variant of English that by 2060 will be unintelligible by today’s older generation.

In 2018 we may see “two” “to” or “too” taking a new form. Or indeed, a pair of these may simply be made redundant leaving behind just a single “two”.

Whether we’ll see the apostrophe being dropped all together in all English curricula from 2018 or whether the Queens English will be superseded by an Anglais Nouveau Européen remains to be seen.

And, just as we familiarise ourselves with these changes to our language in 2018, don’t forget that in 2020 there will be an outright ban on the use of latinisms. Remember that circa 70% of you voted to abolish latinisms, abbreviations, along with a superfluous lists of other things that go on and on etc. etc. etc. If you want to maintain the status quo – take our poll below.

For further reading check out the Apostrophe Abolition Association link.


 

The Launch of the Official 1916 Proclamation in Irish Sign Language


1916 Proclamation in Irish Sign Language on YouTube with optional subtitles

1916 Proclamation in Irish Sign Language on YouTube with subtitles

Download the 1916 Proclamation text here


The Irish Deaf Society, the Centre for Deaf Studies at Trinity College Dublin and Interesource Group (Ireland) Limited work closely on many educational projects and for the 1916 Proclamation Translation project, we convened a small team of translators and interpreters to work on the translation, filming and production of the text. Because Irish Sign Language has no written form, the digital version is a de facto translation: like written translations, it is highly prepared and each element is considered in terms of formality, context, meaning and political resonance. The visual quality of the translator signing has to be crisp and clear – to do otherwise renders the translation ‘inaudible’ for an audience for whom visual access is key. And access to this key historical text is the primary goal of this work.

The Ireland 2016 Centenary Programme commissioned Interesource Group to produce the translated video to ensure that alongside the reading of the 1916 Proclamation which guarantees “equal rights and equal opportunities to all its citizens” that the Irish Sign Language using community would have full access to the 1916 Proclamation in their own language. This facilitates full participation of Deaf citizens on what will be an historic day. This is extremely important as Deaf citizens are continually excluded from daily participation in all walks of life, and this impinges on the opportunity to engage as full citizens. One of the reasons for this is the fact that ISL is not legally recognised or protected in Ireland as an official language of the State, a fact that increasingly marks us out from our European and International counterparts.

Today, the Provost of Trinity College Dublin, Professor Patrick Prendergast, launched a collection of 17 translations of the 1916 Proclamation in the languages taught at the College which includes Irish Sign Language.  The translation of the Official 1916 Proclamation in ISL translation as seen here will also be available on websites across the country.

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1916 Proclamation in Irish Sign Language – making history a hundred years on.

1916 ProclamationTo mark the centenary commemoration of the 1916 Proclamation, Interesource Group (Ireland) Limited was commissioned by the Ireland 2016 Centenary Programme to lead the project and produce the translation of the 1916 Proclamation into Irish Sign Language (ISL).

This is the first time that the 1916 Proclamation has been translated into Irish Sign Language. Alvean Jones translated and presented the Proclamation in Irish Sign Language, with Nora Duggan assisting as ISL monitor.

Interesource Group (Ireland) Limited were delighted to work on this project in partnership with the Irish Deaf Society, the Centre for Deaf Studies at Trinity College Dublin and the Ireland 2016 Centenary Programme. The translation will be available by the 15th March in honour of Proclamation Day, a day when all schools and educational centres around Ireland will raise the National Flag and read the 1916 Proclamation of the Republic.

Irish Sign Language is the first language of the Irish Deaf community in Ireland. By ensuring that information is made available through Irish Sign Language on websites, at live events through ISL interpretation and through subtitling in broadcasting and media channels – Ireland’s linguistic and cultural minority can benefit from equal citizenship and participation in our society.

For any queries ideas or suggestions please contact Haaris on (voice & text) 087 2270311 or

email: isl@igimedia.eu

JUSTISIGNS – Interpreters working with victims of sexual abuse – Masterclass with the Dublin Rape Crisis Centre

Interpreters working with victims of sexual abuse – masterclass with the Dublin Rape Crisis Centre

Interesource Group (Ireland) Limited and the Centre for Deaf Studies, Trinity College Dublin are delighted to be collaborating with the Dublin Rape Crisis Centre who will host this 2-day training session as part of the JUSTISIGNS project masterclass series. The Dublin Rape Crisis Centre has since 1979 offered a wide range of services to women and men who are affected by rape, sexual assault, sexual harassment or childhood sexual abuse. The Education and Training Department of DRCC provides training programmes for professionals and volunteers who provide support or services to victims of sexual violence.

This training programme is designed to prepare deaf and hearing interpreters to work with victims of sexual violence including in their interaction with the legal process. It provides an opportunity to consider the beliefs that exist in society in relation to sexual violence and how they are internalised by and impact upon the victim. Participants will learn about the impact of childhood abuse and of rape and sexual assault. The legal process and its impact on the victim who reports is explored, and issues which arise for the interpreter. The principles and ethics of interpreting are considered in relation to working within this context. Some guidelines are provided regarding interpreting in a counselling situation.

The training approach is participative and experiential. Methods used include group discussion, lecture, case studies, videos, and experiential exercises. The training approach is invitational, with the sensitive nature of the issues being covered and the fact that they may resonate for participants acknowledged. Participation is encouraged but without pressure. There is a strong focus on the impact on the interpreter of working with these issues, the potential for vicarious traumatisation, and strategies the interpreter can employ for self care.

The training programme will be delivered by Leonie O’Dowd, Head of Education and Training and Jane Baird, Education Executive of the Dublin Rape Crisis Centre Education and Training Department.  DRCC develops and delivers tailored training programmes for those providing services and supports to people who have experienced childhood sexual abuse and sexual violence.  DRCC has provided training programmes for ISL interpreters in the past, and has published a Handbook for community interpreters ‘Interpreting in Situations of Sexual Violence and other Trauma’.  Leonie has worked with DRCC for 16 years and is an accredited  psychotherapist with specialist training in the treatment of trauma.  Jane has worked with DRCC for 7 years.  She is also an accredited psychotherapist, and has considerable experience of working and training in the area of disability.

To book please visit:  justisignsdrcc.eventbrite.ie  PLACES ARE LIMITED For any queries please contact Haaris on 087 2270311 or email: info@justisigns.com

Commemorating International Mother Language Day – Irish Sign Language to air on NEWSTALK 106 -108fm

FOR ISL LINK – CLICK HERE

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Dil Wickremasinghe

To commemorate International Mother Language Day, Interesource Group is delighted to be a producer and co-sponsor of the filming of the Irish Sign Language broadcast of a series of interviews aired during the Global Village Saturday night slot, hosted by Dil Wickremasinghe. DOWNLOAD POSTER HERE

This broadcast discusses Irish Sign Language. Experts from Trinity College Dublin’s Centre for Deaf Studies give their views on the recognition of the language in Ireland and what it means for the Irish Deaf community with views from Professor Lorraine Leeson and Dr John Bosco Conama. Dil discusses raising a child with a Deaf mother and also speaks to her hearing child who is a CODA (Children of Deaf Adult). She also explores early child language acquisition with a mother of two Deaf children.

Interesource Group is proud to be a sponsor along with the Centre for Deaf Studies, Bridge Interpreting and Sign Language Interpreting Service.

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Interesource Group and Blood Bike Mid-West (BBMW) – launch fundraising Campaign for 2015

BBMW & IGI

Haaris Sheikh with John Sheedy and Frank Henniger of Blood Bike Mid West

Interesource Group (Ireland) Limited is proud and excited to form a strategic fundraising alliance with Blood Bike Mid-West, a charitable organisation that provides free emergency transport to the HSE, private hospitals, clinics and hospices.

 

Based in Limerick, its motorbike volunteers operate from 7pm through the night providing a nationwide delivery of breast milk, blood, drugs and any other emergency medical products between one hospital and another.

Haaris Sheikh, Chief Executive of Interesource Group (Ireland) Limited has been a supporter of charitable organisations in Ireland and has been involved in fundraising campaigns for St. Vincent’s Lisnagry, Stroke Support Club Limerick and the Deaf Community Centre. Interesource Group has already sponsored some of the Blood Bike Mid-West operational activities, but when John Sheedy, Director of BBMW told his story of how he became involved in BBMW, Haaris could not resist getting involved.

John told Haaris over a cup of coffee overlooking Lough Derg in Killaloe that his son Noel was only seven. He said “he was perfect, full of life and fun, blonde hair and into sport in a big way. My wife spotted this little mark at the back of his ear and the doctors had him in hospital within minutes. While the doctors, our own GP and nurses in the hospital did all that they could, Noel was in a coma within four hours. There was a special drug for meningitis but it was held in Dublin and the hospital had to get it down. They did it as fast as they could but it was too late for Noel.

Often, good inventions come from identifying a very specific need. BBMW did just that. It is a unique service and like so many great causes – is not funded. The costs of operating and acquiring the bikes, the fuel cost and of course the volunteers’ time is managed by fundraising and donations.

Haaris says: “In 2015, I along with my team will be contacting suppliers, supporters, friends and business associates to encourage people to work with me, donate, help in fundraising or run an event from which proceeds can go to BBMW. It’s a worthy cause. Even if we have volunteers who can ride the bikes, someone still has to pay for the fuel and maintenance – so every euro helps towards getting the bikes on the road”.

Celebrating the start of Interesource Group’s alliance with BBMW is marked with the presentation of a cheque for €1000.00 from Declan Collins (General Manager) of The Stables Club, (University of Limerick) where Haaris is director of HR.

For any queries ideas or suggestions please contact Haaris on 087 2270311 or

email: givealittle@interesourcegroup.com

 

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